Attorney Don Loose discusses the intricate timing of abortion laws in Arizona. The Arizona legislature has voted to repeal the 1864 (48 years before Arizona became a state) abortion law that has been on the books for 160 years. Governor Hobbs signed the bill repealing the 1864 law in early May, 2024. That law stated:

“A person who provides, supplies or administers to a pregnant woman or procures such woman to take any medicine, drugs or substances or uses or employs any instrument or other means whatever, with intent thereby to procure the miscarriage of such woman unless it is necessary to save her life, shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not less than two years, nor more than five years.”

The 1864 law takes effect on June 25th of this year. The repeal of the 1864 law doesn’t take effect until September, 2024. If abortion initiatives are added to the November 2024 ballot and passed, they would take effect after vote certification, at the end of November. So, timing is everything.

Disclaimer: Laws change constantly. Specific legal advice should be obtained regarding any legal matter. The information contained on this website does not constitute legal advice and no attorney-client relationship is created. 

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